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Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:09 AM
From 12 O'Clock High!:




Rob
Proximity bombs
Sat May 3 21:23:59 2003
65.34.110.172

In Griehl's book on German anti-tank aircraft ("German Anti-Tank Aircraft: Tank Hunters & Assault Aircraft of the Luftwaffe", by Manfred Griehl, Joachim Dressel, July 2001), there is a picture of a Ju87-D1 with some kind of plaque on the prop commemorating the 300th something (too blurry to read)and the caption mentions this plane was carrying bombs with proximity fuses. I didn't think the Germans ever made much headway with these fuses -- unlike the Allies -- and never really used them. Anyone shed some light on this?

Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:10 AM
From TOCH!:

George Hopp
Two types of proximity units.
Sat May 3 23:20:02 2003
216.191.233.216

The Germans had at least two of these "proximity-type" units that attached to bombs to cause them to explode before hitting the ground. It was used for anti-personnel work in the mud and slime of a Soviet autumn and spring.

One of these was termed a "Stabo" and looked like a peg that attached to the nose of the bomb. For the SC 50 bomb, it was 470mm in length, and behind a pointed tip, 45.5mm in diameter.

The 2nd one, had a flat disk at the tip of a rod that also attached to the nose of the bomb. It has a name, but I can't remember it.

Help you at all?

Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:10 AM
From TOCH!:

Olivier Lefebvre
2nd one
Sat May 3 23:30:44 2003
195.132.11.199

IIRC it was called ZAR and only equipped SC50 and AS250. ZAR standing for ZŁnderabstandsrohr.

Olivier

Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:11 AM
From TOCH!:

George Hopp
Oops, on the Stabo.
Sat May 3 23:57:21 2003
216.191.233.234

The bombs with the Stabo attached were used to attack railway lines. The Stabo length for the SC 500 bomb was 700mm.

In addition, there was a telescoping rod, again for anti-personnel work in the USSR, that extended to 2.3m, 3 seconds after release. It was part of the SD 50 Tel, and SD 70 Tel bombs.

So, these could be called proximity fuses, but only with a good deal of imagination.

Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:11 AM
From TOCH!:

Olivier Lefebvre
Re: Oops, on the Stabo.
Sun May 4 00:15:39 2003
195.132.11.199

and there were also some SD250 Tel. IIRC.

Olivier

Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:12 AM
From TOCH!:

Rob
Manual model
Sun May 4 04:03:41 2003
65.34.110.172

Ah, so this was a manual detonating device rather than an electronic one. Thnx for the info. Any chance of finding a photo of one of these on the net?

Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:12 AM
From TOCH!:

Jim Haycraft
Re: Two types...
Sun May 4 05:05:31 2003
209.240.198.61

IIRC, the second type of device, with the flat disc, was referred to as the "Dinortstab" after then Major Oskar Dinort, the Kommodore of Stukageschwader 2 "Immelmann" from October 1939 to October 1941.

Richard T Eger
06-03-2003, 11:13 AM
From TOCH!:

Michael
Dinort-Staebe
Sun May 4 17:54:34 2003
208.26.188.213

Major Oskar Dinort invented what was not a fuse extension
for bombs, but a strong metal nose spike, to keep the
bomb from ricochetting off hard ground.

It was called a "Stachelspitze" in German, and used e.g.
in attacks on railroad tracks from low altitude, when the
bombs would still have much forward velocity, but little
vertical speed.

The fuse extensions are a different story, and can be
distinguished by the circular end plates.